Childhood fantasy

The joy of reading fairy tales doesn’t end in childhood. Tolkien knew this well. In the words of Sue Vincent…

Sue Vincent's Daily Echo

cslewis writing for children

He’s right… by the time you reach an age with double figures, fairy stories are for babies… and you are no longer a babe. In just the same way that we cease admitting to the guilty affection for the music our parents liked as we grew, so do the books of early childhood get left upon the shelf… at least when anyone is looking.

We ‘progress’ to more complicated reading. Quite often the books we read as teenagers say more about how we would like to be percieved by the world, or reflect the adventures or romance that we long for at that age. Most of those stories, too, are as wildly fantastical as the fairy tales… but being set in ‘reality’, they are more acceptable to our fledgling egos.

Those who loved fairy tales may be lucky, making the early discovery of fantasy and science fiction… which may simply…

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About Jennie

I have been teaching preschool for over thirty years. This is my passion. I believe that children have a voice, and that is the catalyst to enhance or even change the learning experience. Emergent curriculum opens young minds. It's the little things that happen in the classroom that are most important and exciting. That's what I write about. I am highlighted in the the new edition of Jim Trelease's bestselling book, "The Read-Aloud Handbook" because of my reading to children. My class has designed quilts that hang as permanent displays at both the National Liberty Museum in Philadelphia, and the Fisher House at the Boston VA Hospital.
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7 Responses to Childhood fantasy

  1. Opher says:

    I love reading fairy stories to my grandchildren! They are just as good as they always were!

  2. I love fairy tales and I always have to this day. I prefer reading fantasy that is akin to fairy tales! Thanks for a great post that is a joy to me and my rose colored glasses.

  3. beetleypete says:

    That’s a good quote from Lewis, and a worthy reblog, Jennie. I have never forgotten any of my childhood books, and certainly think that there is nothing wrong with reading them at any age.
    Best wishes, Pete.

  4. What a marvelous quote, Jennie. I couldn’t agree more. Hugs.

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